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Tuesday, May 26, 2015

The Apache Cache

The Apache Cache

A cache can take many forms, from a bucket in the ground, to a concealed package up on a tree limb, to a hidey hole in a wall. And variations of all of these.
Before we had all the fine water proof containers  we now have at our disposal, the problem was keeping things dry and safe. Most folks when they think of a cache think hole in the ground. The hole in the ground has a place for sure. Over many years in my studies of the “cache” in all of it’ s provocative forms, I have stumbled upon many that are somewhat unique in the “build”, and placement. These include many that I have found in the bush, and forests, back yards, and other places too many to name.
 One of my many interests are the Apache, I have studied and read many books about this little known people as far as their lifestyle is concerned. Most think they know about these poeple  but much that is known has been given a blackeye because of the point of view of the writers, and a bunch of bad movie depictions. The Apache were the last indians to be studied, the last to be interviewed, and most of those interviews did not happen until the 1930s. But I digress, this about a cache and how the Apache used what they had, how they hid this cache from prying eyes, and kept it safe. This is one of the Apache traditional methods. I will bet you that some have never been recovered.
 A hole in the ground sideways. Yep, most of the time it is called a cave. The Apache cache was dug into the side of a bluff, arroyo, cliff, etc. They stashed food, weapons, clothing, containers, even water, anything that would help them when they returned. By hollowing out a small cave, for lack of another word, they lay in thick layers of grasses, reeds, stones, large containers, hides, each layer was seperated, until the cache held what they wanted. The cave, might be 4 feet deep, so you could reach in pretty easy, and as high as  3  to 6 feet.
 Once the cache was filled with goods, if wood was available, small wrist sized lengths were planted firmly along with reeds and stones,  so a wall was built to seal off the entrance. Once it was sealed they would wet clay, sand, dirt, stones, and match the rest of the face of the bluff ,  cliff etc, when it dried it blended in with all the rest. The inside of the “cave” was lined as much as possible before the final seal began.
 Simple and effective. Not the normal place one would think to bury something. As I mentioned, most think “down” and not “sideways”.  These caches were and are very effective today. Not the place most metal detector folks look at at all. Take the time on your next trek, look for likely places you could cache sideways, the Apache cache.
 You of course can make your cache much smaller, which is my recomendation,  you can make a series of them, that way losing one will not be the end. Like that would happen.
 The Apache cache method is a good one to consider when pondering how, and where. All you have to do is add the modern water proof containers, so let it be the Apache Cache.

By Dude McLean

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3 comments:

  1. The Apache are a fine and fascinating people with many great traditions..

    Dude

    ReplyDelete
  2. thankyou Mags , glad you liked it thanks for posting on my blog, new stuff on the way..

    Dude

    ReplyDelete